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241 book reviews found (page 6 of 49 pages). Narrow reviews by book audience:
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Book cover Around Our Way on Neighbors' Day
Tameka Fryer Brown (2010) , under 40 pages
Illustrated by Charlotte Riley-Webb
Audience: Primary (k-3rd grade), Intermediate (4th-6th grade)
Category: African-American, Multicultural, Novello, Realistic Fiction
(This book has outstanding illustrations)


This picture book is told from the point of view of a young African- American girl. She first goes around the neighborhood seeing all her neighbors, both young and old, and their activities. The young girl’s neighbors are diverse and include people of many shades and cultures. “Blue sky, no clouds” is a repeated phrase in this rhyming book that reads like poetry and contains many action words. The flowing illustrations with their many colors are full of movement and fun. The book ends with a special party. This is a wonderful book about multiculturalism and being neighborly.

Reviewed by: Jeanenne / Steele Creek Library
If you liked this book, you may also like:
Parental Notes

Comments from Readers

Ava, age 7 from UK
I love this book


Book cover Ben and the Emancipation Proclamation
Pat Sherman (2010) , under 40 pages
Illustrated by Floyd Cooper
Audience: Intermediate (4th-6th grade), Adult/Parent
Category: African-American, Historical, Realistic Fiction
(This book has outstanding illustrations)


This is a great story based on the life of Benjamin Holmes. Benjamin was a slave whose master allowed him to help Mr. Bleeker, one of Charleston's finest tailors. But Ben has a little secret...He can read!! Mr. Bleeker brags to customers about Ben because he knows so much! But the Civil War breaks out and the Bleekers leave Charleston and Ben has to go to a slave prison until he is sold. What will happen to Ben now? Will he read his way to freedom and a new life? This is a great story with beautiful illustrations about a young boy who is destined for greatness.

Reviewed by: Annie / West Boulevard Library
If you liked this book, you may also like:

Book cover Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave
Laban Carrick Hill (2010) , under 40 pages
Illustrated by Bryan Collier
Audience: Primary (k-3rd grade), Intermediate (4th-6th grade)
Category: African-American, Biographies, Historical, Multicultural, NCCBA, Non-Fiction, Poetry, Read Aloud
(This book has outstanding illustrations)


This moving book is about a man who had a unique talent. Dave the Potter was a slave in South Carolina, but he was also an artist and poet. The book’s text is a poem written by Hill using images and expressive language to describe the steps Dave may have gone through when making his creations. Collier’s well-known illustrations span two pages, while the poem is in bold colors on the side. The poetic text fits this book; Dave sometimes wrote short poems on his work and signed it. The back of this book goes into details about some of his poems and where their meanings may have originated. Although there is not a lot of information about Dave the Potter’s life, his work and words live on.

Reviewed by: Jeanenne / Steele Creek Library
Parental Notes

Comments from Readers

Jordan, age 9 from North America
I like the book `Dave the Potter` because it talks about black history and a man in the past like one hundred years ago


Book cover Lucky Beans
Becky Birtha (2010) , under 40 pages
Illustrated by Nicole Tadgell
Audience: Primary (k-3rd grade)
Category: African-American, Historical
(This book has outstanding illustrations)


Marshall’s Ma makes beans every night for dinner. Although she is a good cook, he is really tired of eating beans, but it is the Great Depression, his dad is out of work, and beans are all that his family can afford. One day, Marshall is surprised to see beans in the window of the furniture store. “How many beans are in the jar? Win this brand new sewing machine!” he reads on a sign. Marshall knows his Ma would like that sewing machine, but how will he ever guess the right number? Then he remembers something he learned in math class that just might help his Ma win that contest. Read this colorfully illustrated book to find out what Marshall remembered, and if his Ma won the sewing machine.

Reviewed by: Ellen / Sugar Creek
If you liked this book, you may also like:

Book cover My Brother Charlie
Holly Robinson Peete and Ryan Elizabeth Peete (2010) , under 40 pages
Illustrated by Shane W. Evans
Audience: Preschool, Primary (k-3rd grade), Adult/Parent
Category: African-American, Special Needs
(This book has outstanding illustrations)


Did you know there are ways to say “I love you” without using the words? Callie’s brother Charlie has a hard time finding his words, because he has autism. Sometimes, Charlie has a hard time with other things, too, like hugs or finding new friends. Life with Charlie can be hard, but it is always special. Callie explains what having a brother like Charlie is like in the beautiful, colorful illustrations. This great explanation of life with autism was written by a mother and daughter working together. See if you can figure out how Charlie says, “I love you!”

Reviewed by: Larisa / University City Regional Library
If you liked this book, you may also like: Autism and Me: Sibling Stories
Parental Notes

Comments from Readers

Alicia, age 85 from NC
Charlie and his sister have a unique bond of everlasting love.



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